Current Projects

  • This project will conduct a randomized clinical trial in five Educare schools. It will include longitudinal follow-up of 250 infants and their families through kindergarten. Measures will include annual child developmental assessments, videotaped parent-child interaction observations, and parent interviews and surveys. The specific aim of the project is to examine the effectiveness of Educare, a model early intervention program for children from low-income families.
  • Representatives from the Child and Family Policy Institute of California and the California Department of Social Services are working as a Core California Staff Team to coordinate technical assistance and support to Fresno, Humboldt, and Santa Clara counties and two Los Angeles County child welfare offices for implementing and sustaining a Child and Family Practice Model as part of the California Partners for Permanency project.
  • The purpose of this project is to document the efficacy of a widely used professional development model that promotes program quality, teachers' use of evidence-based practices (EBPs), and outcomes for elementary school-age children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study will respond to a national need to prepare teachers to design effective, research based educational programs for children with ASD.
  • Elementary school is the critical period for setting the stage for children's future academic success. The most important academic skill that is developed during this period is literacy, without which most other content area material cannot be learned well. The current project will have unique opportunities to better understand what factors contribute to literacy trajectories, as well as factors that may buffer children against poor trajectories.
  • The goal of this project is to provide training and nine months of ongoing support to a Smart Start of Forsyth County Teaching and Learning Specialist serving as a coach in the More Than Baby Talk, Plus! coaching program.
  • The Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy Center) provides national leadership and technical assistance to states to support early intervention and early childhood special education state programs in the development or enhancement of coordinated early childhood longitudinal data systems.
  • The Center on Secondary Education for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (CSESA) is a multi-site research and development center that will develop a school- and community-based comprehensive treatment model (CTM) for high school students with ASD and conduct an efficacy study of the impact of the CTM on multiple student outcomes and transition to post-school settings.
  • Consistent with the commitment of OSEP to a focus on Implementation Science in the process of the State Systemic Improvement Plan, the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) and the State Implementation and Scaling-up of Evidence-based Practices Center (SISEP) will collaborate to build the Implementation Science fluency of an internal NCSI Implementation Team for use in support of SEA Implementation Teams, and to track and evaluate SEA implementation capacity through the use of the State Capacity Assessment.
  • The Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (ECTA Center) funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) builds upon the foundation of several recent OSEP-funded TA centers to improve service systems and assist states in scaling up and sustaining effective services and research-based interventions for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with disabilities and their families.
  • The extent to which and how early education reduces achievement gaps related to race and income have not been studied extensively in rural areas in the United States, despite clear evidence that these achievement gaps are even larger in the rural United States, and especially in rural areas in the Southeast, high quality-early education is one of the most effective means to promote educational success for all children.
  • This project leverages and builds upon an existing longitudinal cohort to propose hypotheses that investigate the ways in which early life stress alters well-specified developmental processes to adversely affect neurodevelopment in childhood and increase risk for obesity. It extends our prior data collection both retrospectively and prospectively in order to amplify and enhance our focus on adverse exposures and health outcomes in the areas of neurodevelopment and obesity.
  • The goal of this project is to conduct follow-up studies of Educare graduates as they enter kindergarten and progress through the early elementary years. A team at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute will coordinate and support the Educare local evaluators as they launch new follow-up studies or expand existing follow-up study efforts in 8-12 U.S. cities where there is an Educare school. This 3-year project will gather data on at least 3 years of Educare graduates and, in some sites, data from their parents as well.
  • This is an IES-funded evaluation of the Incredible Years Dinosaur Classroom Prevention Program (IY Dina) and Teacher Classroom Management (IYT) Program on pre-k students' social-emotional functioning, executive functioning, and early academic skills. The study will involve approximately 120 NC PreK classrooms in four counties in North Carolina. Approximately 1200 preschool children from 120 classrooms will enter the study in two cohorts during preschool and will be followed up in kindergarten.
  • This project is designed to provide a statewide evaluation of the NC Pre-K Program. The primary research questions addressed include who is served by the NC Pre-K Program, what are the characteristics and quality of services provided, and what are the outcomes for children attending the program. Data are gathered from multiple sources including classroom observations, teacher surveys, child assessments, and monthly program reports.
  • This study will examine the association between vocabulary and Executive Function (EF) for children without exposure to typical language by assessing early language and later EF in deaf preschool children with recent cochlear implants. It will address the question of whether children's early vocabulary acts as a precursor to EF when children do not have the ability to hear verbal language.